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Defined strategies & efficient use of resources . . . .

October 2nd, 2008

Needless to say, my schedule has been getting crushed since I’ve started my new engagement in San Diego. My work is not only being conducted in the office, but at home after hours to get up to speed as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, one of the items to suffer has been the regular update of my site. It’s been tough trying to strategize and get my updates in. I’m going to try doing a number of posts through the weekend and updating through the week. We’ll see if that works….

However, I was on the bike early this morning (can’t give this up….) and I was doing some of my high-intensity interval work and evaluating the wattage numbers. Since I was tired this morning and was on a second consecutive day of intervals I decided to back-off and get some easy miles in. As I was spinning around Fiesta Island, where I’ll be racing in 2-weeks, I started evaluating my equipment, diet, and what kind of lead in I should be prepping for the race. One thing that came to mind, which has not before, is defining a specific course strategy and my line around the island. After all, what’s to consider, its a round island and you just need to go out and hammer. Right? Wrong….

I decided to do two laps. One lap would be a sloppy line around the island and taking the outside perimeter of a single car wide land around the island. The second would be a combination of inside lines and smooth transitions. I didn’t care about times….just the mileage. The first lap, the sloppy lap, resulted in a 4.17 mile reading. The second lap, picking what I though would be the most efficient line. The second lap came in at 4.11 miles. Ok…I know…only .06 miles. However, on race day we’ll be doing 3 laps. That translates to .18 miles. Let’s say I fall in the mid-range and a minor level of sloppiness costs me .1 mile. With a mile at clocking in at 2.3 minutes, or 150 seconds, that translates to a potential improvement, or penalty of 15 seconds. Huge in a time trial.

I started considering the application of this same concept to my budgeting efforts and the establishment of goals for 2009. As I’ve previously written, it’s not about hitting huge home runs, but more about making those small incremental changes and making sure that you’re making the most effective use of your resources. How do I produce a higher level of EBIT through an efficient use of my resources. How do you hit your goals without blowing out the finance element of your organization? It’s an interesting consideration and one I continue to practice in my professional career.
Thanks for reading. . . .

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