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Your lack of planning is not my new “emergency”. . . .

April 28th, 2009

     It’s really amazing how quickly you can progress from a rather nicely paying Project on a Friday afternoon to a complete implosion over the course of a weekend, culminating in a withdrawal from the project. I certainly wasn’t anticipating it, but that’s exactly what happened last weekend.  The crazy part about the situation is that it was really the product of two inappropriately worded emails outlining the disappointment in progress and the lack of execution to date. Funny, while discussions had been happening the better part of 6-8 weeks, the engagement wasn’t supposed to start until May 1, and the majority of the time until now had been gratis…or perhaps “ungratis”.

     The entity I had been having discussions with was effectively a 3rd round funding candidate who had developed a pretty fantastic product, and in the characterization of any MBA student, was looking to legitimately be a “disruptive technology”.  They had been able to keep their operations lean and were making effective use of existing cash resources. However, as early as the open of Q1 it was clear that they were going to need to bring in additional operating funds. However, there was an incumbent “CFO”, who really did not have the background for the position, but nonetheless was tasked with the responsibility. Quite simply, the Company had an obligation to support this individual so long as they allowed him to remain in the position. Unfortunately for the company, and their need to aggressively pursue additional funding, there were no results on the part of the incumbent. The Company finally decided last week that they wanted to move forward with an agreement that would have me pursuing funding (#1 priority), but would also be setting the foundation for the broader finance function within the company. From the development of a new software platform, to the tracking of cost standards, the development of all their financial reporting, to representing them at certain investor events. This was all last week.

     Within the span of 72-hours after having my first on-site meeting after agreeing to the engagement, I immediately was being called to task as to why the fundraising wasn’t happening in a more agressive manner, that I had been provided all info over the preceeding 6-weeks, and questioning whether I was truly committed to the project. Did I miss something, or did we just agree on a May 1 start to the project?  The wording of the emails was also strong enough, and disrespective enough, that I knew immediately that this was not a long-term engagement I wanted to be a part of.  I was basically being held responsible for the inactions of a previous incumbent and the lack of action on the part of founders to ensure that their financing goals were on track for achievement. The situation was no different than missing key patent filings over the last quarter, hiring a new VP of Design/Engineering, and asking why patents weren’t filed….before their arrival.

     There’s no question working in the role of Finance, we are all accustomed to having to deal with emergencies and having to reprioritize tasks as conditions shift. However, there is also the element of appropriately placed accountability and following up on deliverables that were properly planned for.  It’s also quite clear, that even with proper planning, certain goals aren’t achieved, and that strategies need to be altered. However, a complete lack of planning, a lack of collaboration with current staff, and not supporting them in the necessary way does not translate as my emergency and something new players should be held accountable for. High caliber Finance consultants can provide solutions, but when the work is conducted under a condition of desperation, the results will never turn out positive, and quite often, result in the least desirable situation.

Thanks for reading . . . .

Jeffrey Ishmael

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