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Hyper Growth…Do You Know Your Company CTL Level?

December 22nd, 2016

ctl-chartFor my friends and colleagues that know me, they know that I am fiercely driven both in the office…and on the bike. While I’ve tempered the shoulder and elbow bumping criterium racing these days in favor of career preservation, there is no decreased focus in the pursuit of achieving the best results I can on the bike. In fact, it was a laser focus and a very defined training plan that allowed me to achieve a 2014 title win for the SoCal Time Trial Series, which covered more than a dozen races. Some would think that this is a futile pursuit and an endeavor not worth the investment of time. However, I continue to realize the correlations between what happens on the bike and what happens in a corporate environment. It comes down to disciplines, awareness, proper planning, and executing on the strategy that you put in place. There’s no cutting corners, there’s no accidental or chance success…it’s about appropriate planning and execution. Period.

For me, getting out on a bike ride doesn’t mean just heading out for 3-5 hours, plugging in some music, and getting some good exercise. It’s about have a specific plan for that day. It’s about having specific time execution in specific power zones with specific cadence output…and REST in between those efforts. How does this even relate to corporate execution? We don’t go into the office and hope that the Quarter comes together in the last 5-10 days…although we all know this seems to be the case in just about every industry. HOWEVER, we do head into the Quarter with a blueprint that is typically part of a larger annual plan, that has Quarterly quotas, quotas that are supported by the necessary Sales headcount, as well as a host of other preplanned Marketing and operational support elements. While I commit to a daily training plan and see the immediate measurements of that output, that same realization doesn’t happen in a corporate environment. We continue to put in the “training” on a daily basis, but sometimes the runway to actually see the benefit might take a few months…or possibly a few Quarters on a more significant deal. It’s about having a plan and executing against it. A plan that is achievable. You break that plan down into its core elements and you execute against it. Period.

How does this all relate to hyper growth and corporate performance? Very simply…it’s the ability to maintain a sustainable pace that doesn’t overheat the engine, doesn’t waste resources in an inefficient way, and will allow the individuals, and ultimately the team, to cross the finish line…together. In cycling and the tracking of fitness, there are two lines that are followed during the course of executing a training plan…the CTL and ATL lines. The CTL line, or Chronic Training Load, measures your cumulative output of a trailing 28-day period. The ATL line, or Acute Training Load, measures the short term extreme spikes in training that indication your ability, or inability, to continue putting in sustained efforts. Think of the CTL line as a 200-day moving average for a company stock. You don’t want wild fluctuations in this line, and when there are, it typically isn’t healthy. You may have shorter term efforts that bring your CTL line up…but the ATL line realizes an extreme divergence away from the CTL and starts to indicate potential exhaustion and the need to rest. It’s the same concept at a corporate level, but drawn out over multiple Quarters than multiple weeks. Just like the cyclist, employees can put in a hell of an effort, but continued redlining will lead to that overextended ATL line, an unhealthy and unsustainable spike in the CTL, and eventually a condition of overtraining where either the team gets sick or rest is mandatory.

Knowing how to pace yourself and your team is critical to maintaining a path and a cadence that can continue driving a level of hyper growth. It’s taken multiple lessons for me to learn from others that it’s necessary to know and understand all the inputs that help maintain the pace. I don’t know how many times I was told to slow down and get some rest in the training by my coach. REST?!?!? Are you joking?!?!? “I’m feeling great and I don’t need to rest…”. Follow that with either getting sick or starting to see a drop in the performance level. “What do you mean rest…this isn’t the first time I’ve ridden a bike and I’ll know when I need to rest.” is what I might convey to my coach dismissing his feedback and experiences. I’ve since come to appreciate his valuable feedback and it was his feedback that was a major factor in securing a regional title.

Coming back to a corporate environment and the link to cycling…it’s all about the plan and managing all the necessary inputs to achieve that plan.

Revenue.    Corporate…what’s the Quarterly and Annual Plan? Cycling…what are the major event goals and the power level necessary to achieve the result?
Cost of Goods.    Corporate…what are all the elements necessary to produce? Cycling…what are the dietary needs to stay properly fueled, recover, and continue building on the achieved results?
Operating Expenses.    Corporate…what is the necessary cost structure to support the Plan & the resources available to achieve the plan? Cycling…what is the cost of nutritional supplements, tires, tubes, equipment, travel, etc.?
Net Income.    Corporate…with consideration to all the inputs, is the company achieving it’s planned result? Cycling…are you making progress towards achieving the wattage goals and distance goals? If not, is there a tweak to the inputs that can be made that may result in the same outcome?
It might be a bit simplistic of an analogy, but you can see the correlation between the two. While some might see my quantitative view on cycling as a bit unfortunate, it’s what makes me tick and it’s what I love about my career. For the same reason that I can’t just show up in the office and put in 8-9 hours and collect a check…nor can I get on my bike and just go for a ride…at least not with any frequency. I’m completely driven by performance and performance doesn’t happen without a strict plan in place, a set of metrics to track the plan, and the commitment to deliver. Period. In a situation of hyper growth, you need to be keenly aware of the elements and their impact on, and contribution to, delivering performance. You also need to realize that an excessive use of resources, which may ultimately be waste, will not necessarily deliver the desired results. There is no set formula…but it’s all about having the experience to know how to balance the inputs, drive a sustainable cadence, and deliver on what you promise. Changes to the plan? They happen, but don’t introduce a new race to the calendar next week, load up at the buffet with a ton of carbs, and hope that is going to get you through with a successful result…

Thanks for reading…

Jeffrey Ishmael

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