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Anaplan…& Implementing a Robust Forecasting Platform: Billings & Revenue

March 24th, 2017 Comments off

For the first few years at Cylance there was not a huge reliance on our forecasting platform and the need to put a pricey tool in place. There was simply no need to spend a six-figure amount when our business was still an entirely domestic story and the core revenue stream was still Professional Services. While we implemented NetSuite within our first few Quarters as a company, we opted for the NetSuite as our core platform so we could then bolt on additional modules as needed. We opted for their forecasting module almost immediately, but for a very basic forecasting function. As a Professional Services story, we only had a basic need to forecast gross labor hours, utilization rates, hourly cost rates, as well as estimated billing rates. At this point, we still did not have any consideration to Product revenue, and in the absence of, did not have any considerations for revenue recognition at that point. Considering that our Services revenue was not invoiced until completed, it was a very straightforward modeling exercise.

Fast forward to the launch of our Product offering and we knew it was going to necessitate a jump to a new platform as we were already starting to see some weakness in the NetSuite module. This new phase required an entirely different level of forecasting considerations for which there was no historical activity and for price points that had not been previously seen in the security sector. Would we actually realized, and stabilize, at a pricing level that would be many multiples over the incumbent first generation AV offerings. With consideration to the Product forecasting;

  • Average price per node on an annualized basis
  • Billings distribution by contract length…12, 24, and 36-months
  • Flexibility to easily adjust the anticipated weighting of billings
  • Subscription or Perpetual agreements (very few perpetual, but still present)
  • Robust deferred revenue modeling as a result of signed contracts
  • Sales staff hiring and assigned quotas.
  • Implementing any “seasonality” consideration into the model
  • Existing quotas, annualized growth, as well as ramp up period for new hires.
  • OEM, Consumer, and Government assumptions.
  • International entities & expected exchange rates for a consolidated USD view
  • Contra revenue accounts

It’s pretty easy to see that, even the short list above, there was going to be an entirely new level of complexity to our forecasting efforts, which could not be accommodated in our original module. After meeting with one of our key investors and discussing some of the options available, Anaplan seemed to emerge as a strong candidate and we made the decision to move forward. It was time to put a more robust tool in place as we started moving towards 9-figure revenue goals.  Even with the move to a new forecasting tool, we also had an entirely unique challenge as in developing a the components of this Forecast without a wealth of historical performance metrics. This meant that we would be constantly updating the Forecast as we compiled more Product transaction data. Fortunately for us, we saw a relative level of stability in our average PPN and our contract lengths. The two most difficult elements we had to work through during the implementation was the buildout of the deferred revenue forecast and the buildout of the revenue forecast that was supported by a detailed hiring plan and the assigned quotas for each one of those individuals. This was not going to be a simple spreadsheet exercised based on modifying a few cells and voila’…you have an annual number! The goal was to build a platform that would hold up to the scrutiny of our investors as well as easily identify & bridge any performance shortfalls that were realized versus planned.

In taking one example of where Anaplan excelled was in the modeling of our domestic revenues through the quotas that were assigned to each of our sales staff. While a painstaking exercise, there was an itemization of every existing sales staff, as well as those who were recently hired, or planned to be hired. There were individual quotas assigned to each one of these individuals. For those new hires, there were additional considerations to a ramp up period as they learned our tech, the inner workings of the Company, as well as seeding their existing network in their new employment. While these assumptions were usually conservative to reflect a few Quarters of nominal contribution, most were ramping extremely quickly. However, were we going to see the same level of immediate success as we scaled from a few dozen to sales staff to a multiple of that? That’s where we would have flexibility in Anaplan to adjust the model accordingly. From a billings and revenue modeling perspective, the only limits in Anaplan would be those that we placed on ourselves. However, we also had to be careful that the levels of planning detail we opted to incorporate would be important in the planning of the business and not turn into an exercise of planning paralysis.

The second painstaking, but worthwhile effort, was the buildout of the deferred revenue model. With the help of one of Anaplan’s premier implementation staff members, this was efficiently tackled and resulted in a clearly mapped Forecast that was easily trackable after any changes were made to new sales hires, quota modifications, or changes to average contract lengths. It was no longer the “black box” that we were challenged with on our prior platform. The additional benefit of the new Anaplan deferred revenue forecast is that it was easily audited and reviewed against the underlying assumptions. This would have played a pretty key role in our prior financing round in which there was a divide between the models presented by investors and our internal view…on the older platform. As one investor had noted during those efforts…”We’re familiar with that module and it is a bit of black box…”. A nice affirmation of our decision to move to Anaplan, but we were not yet fully deployed on Anaplan to supply the new view.

With respect to our choice to move to Anaplan, we also chose to work directly with the Anaplan implementation team as we wanted to keep our entire efforts and focus inside the Anaplan camp. I opted not to risk having a point of weakness between Anaplan and the efforts of a 3rd party reseller for implementation. It was a great decision and the Anaplan team was fantastic. In the end, the primary goal of moving to Anaplan was to be able to provide complete transparency to our investors, provide them the confidence that there was a robust set of underlying assumptions in the Forecast, and to allow for an intelligent dialogue on the integrity of the underlying Forecast. That once unbundled, it would be easy enough to see where any weakness might be occurring if there was a shortfall against Plan. We’ll jump into the cost of goods and operating expenses in the next round…

Thanks for reading.

Jeffrey Ishmael

Employees, Facilities, & Systems In A Hyper Growth Environment…

January 19th, 2017 Comments off

IMG_0219     I’m really enjoying the conversations that I’m having with prospective new teams, as well as the vendors that I partnered with during the hyper growth phases at Cylance. The most predominant question is “how did you guys plan that out and accommodate the growth you did?”. Really, the level of success we achieved was not planned, at least not in the timeline that it was achieved in. From the outset, we had “modest” growth that still had us doubling our billings on an annual basis. We knew early on that we were going to have a relatively aggressive trajectory, but certainly not the hyper growth we were confronted with. While it has its blessings, it also tables an entirely unique set of challenges. Challenges on finding that appropriate balance in planning out employee growth, facility growth, as well as the systems you want to put in place…all with a focus on prudent spend knowing that the wrong decisions will result in unnecessary cash burn.
Employees. While we were extremely surgical in the original hiring, there were also unplanned surprises that increased our headcount, and thus our burn. Take for example the assumptions about our product and what we were anticipating relative to the ongoing support of our customers. Early on, the assumption was that our product would be entirely turnkey, that any deployments would be extremely rapid, and that the product would be easily integrated into any customers native environment. Well…not so fast. We quickly determined that we would indeed need a more robust customer support team, and one that was going to be more than just a few people. It was not a difficult decision to make as we knew this was the best decision for the customer and the best decision in support of our product and future success. We just needed to ensure that we moderated our spend in other others to accommodate the unplanned spend. As with some of our other spend, these were not black & white spreadsheet decisions and we worked through all the shades of grey as a team. Also early on we were aggressive in the buildout of our Sales Engineering team. This team was the technical complement to our Sales team and would be responsible for any pre-sale technical questions, proof of concepts, deployment issues, etc. As we started to close more business it was determined we needed a dedicated team just to handle the proof of concepts with prospective customers. Again, not in the plan, additional headcount, and thus, an increase in our cash burn. More conversation that thad to be addressed by the broader team and ensure that the metrics that we were operating under continued increasing in the face of rapid employee growth.
Facilities. When you start out in a living room on fold up tables you tend to maintain that same prudence planning and moving into new locations. We had early support for an investor with some temporary space. Following that, it was then a big commitment for us to assume a five year lease on a 12k square foot space when we still had barely secured our first Services customer. Even more surprising was outgrowing that space in less than two years. The other three years? We had always negotiated great leases so we had no problems maintaining cash flow neutrality when we subleased that space and moved into a new 16k square foot space, but with the opportunity to expand to additional floors within the same building. Imagine our surprise when we realized that in less than a year we were going to be out of space due to a dramatic increase in bookings after we signed the lease. We then renewed our relationship with The Irvine Company to lease additional space in an adjacent building and could easily expand to additional floors. As with our earlier leases, we always ensured we had negotiated leases that we could sublease if necessary if there were any unplanned corrections to the business that had us with excess capacity. However, it wasn’t excess capacity that was the issue, but a lack of. As I had successfully worked with other companies in a campus type environment, we started leasing vacant space in adjoining buildings to accommodate the rapid growth. There was little cap ex for buildout and we had exceptional flexibility. Even as we started to occupy a significant amount of space in prominent high rise buildings adjacent to the airport, while also securing prominent building top signage, we were able to keep our facility expense to less than two percent of our total operating expenses. Building top signage on two buildings that would essentially create the Cylance corridor near the airport.
Systems. As I was handed a laptop with Quickbooks on my first day i knew that this would not be our platform moving forward and quickly looked at what we might deploy that would carry us out over the next 2-3 years…or more. It was determined that Netsuite would be the platform and we could add additional modules as we grew and our needs changed. Whether commissions, deferred revenue, fixed assets, or multi-currency, Netsuite provided an economical platform that was widely adopted and could scale. I had just completed an SAP implementation and it was clear that we didn’t need to go in the direction of Oracle or SAP, both from a complexity, as well as a cost perspective. There were also some other great platforms that we had looked at early on. As an example, we had looked at Domo as a candidate for our dashboard platform. However, at a full implementation cost approaching six figures it just didn’t make sense early on as we had very little to report on in a pre-revenue capacity. A great platform, but not for the nominal amount of financial data we were compiling. Fast forward to a year of accumulated product bookings, pipeline data, channel data, etc. and we were properly positioned to take advantage of it, which we did. As we also started to push towards employee growth of almost 500 we knew that the HR & Payroll module in Netsuite was not going to be robust enough for what we needed and determined that Workday would be the appropriate platform as the company started scaling towards a headcount in the thousands. A year prior and headcount of barely 120 there was certainly no reason to spend high six figures to license and implement Workday. However, a year later and employee count approaching 500 it became a much easier discussion to have.
So how do you plan for employees, facilities, and systems in a hyper growth trajectory? You really don’t. There is no Board meeting that your going to roll into and legitimately say your going to go from $10M to $100M in the next year…not unless you’re going to sedate them and move quickly through that slide. However, you do put the systems and decisions in place that will give you the most flexibility to continue altering your course without having to look back with the realization that you’ve incurred a significant amount of sunk costs that really didn’t deliver any value or provide you with future flexibility. Decisions have to be made in tandem with the broader team, the key vendors that you’ve established relationships with, as well as the input of the Board and key advisors. It’s a heck of a ride and one your not going to be discussing in B-schoool…although look for a Cylance case study in the future!
Thanks for reading…
Jeffrey Ishmael

Is Your Corporate Security Worth The Cost of a Monthly Latte?

February 18th, 2015 Comments off

I’ve had the opportunity to work with some incredibly sharp Finance folks, many of whom are able to deliver on their budgeted results regardless of what curveballs are thrown at them. Some are able to effectively deal with shades of grey while exhibiting a focus on what is best for the company. Others are rigid, run the company with an iron fist, and if not budgeted….it’s not going to be spent…no matter what. It’s the latter approach that I have seen quite often recently and it leaves me scratching my head as to the flawed logic that drives their actions.

As you can imagine, I’ve had the opportunity to watch our team deal with some of the most serious breaches, which are usually reported across most newswires. Breaches that could have easily been prevented, but are now going to cost companies a significant amount to repair, as well as have to rebuild their reputational goodwill with customers…or in some cases, spend more to offset the loss of critical IP.  In the midst of these breaches, I’ve seen companies argue whose budget will carry the cost of the response because it wasn’t part of the original plan. They sit and quibble about the lack of Budget dollars in the face of a breach where millions of records have been released or critical IP has been compromised.

Let’s back up though to a point in time prior to the breach. The Cylance team goes in and walks through our technology and displays its absolute effectiveness to the prospective customer. It is all too clear that our solution crushes the traditional antivirus “solution” and would either protect them from malware that has hit their competitors, or in the most optimal display, would have prevented the breach that had just occurred. They’re also shown the efficiency in which our platform operates and places a CPU load in the low single digits, which again, is at the opposite end of the traditional antivirus spectrum that typically has the CPU redlined under an attack. Let’s not even talk about the additional cost of incident response that have to be carried in the event of a breach, which is often in the range of $400-500/hr depending on the seriousness. Don’t like paying legal fees for frivolous actions? Try paying those fees when you know they could have been avoided for the cost of a latte…

As simple as this sounds, it really does come down to the cost of a latte…and this is no joke. Companies cater business lunches for “working meetings”, companies tend to get a bit loose in the wallet for other “business events”, but there is also the retort of “we don’t have any open spend for this area…”. So let me rephrase what you just said:  Are you saying that you don’t have any open spend equivalent to the cost of a coffee for each endpoint in your enterprise to ensure the security of your employee records, customer records, and critical intellectual property?

While I certainly don’t like surprises or unplanned spend, we are certainly operating in different times and need to be able to adequately protect the data and prior investments we’ve been entrusted with. It used to be a failed ERP implementation that might cost a CFO or CIO their job, but now it will likely be ineffective security spend and ineffective deployment that will cost jobs. When the situation has the absolute ability to effect revenues and jeopardize key data…the CFO has to be involved and do what is best for the business. Perhaps that’s something to consider when you’re sipping that latte during your transitional networking meetings…

Thanks for reading.

Jeffrey Ishmael

When Processes & Systems Are Put To The Test…

January 21st, 2015 Comments off

Part of the enjoyment that I get from working at a “start-up” is that we essentially have a blank canvas on which to build the company, configure our systems, and define processes. Processes that are both needed, as well as in the best interests of the company. Essentially the establishment of a back office configuration that will support increasing growth as opposed to legacy decisions that are still carried out within a larger enterprise that are simply no longer adding any value.

However, until you’re tested, how do you know the decisions you’ve been making will be positively affirmed and be of value to the organization? From an operational point of view we’ve had a number of touch points that have tested our systems. Whether it’s been the growth of our employee base, the successful completion of our Series-B fundraising, or our accounting audit….we’ve had multiple opportunities to test our systems.

From an operational point of view, I’ve chose to run headcount in a VERY lean manner and instead invest in systems that would support the highest level of efficiency. I’m probably working with the smallest Finance & HR team that I’ve had at any company, yet we’ve continued to successfully respond to due diligence and audit requests that typically involve the generation of hundreds of supporting documents to validate what we are reporting. While tedious, we have the systems and processes in place to respond to these requests.

We’ve also had to strike a very fine balance between implementing system enhancements and the need to run the day-to-day operations. We could have easily put Commission and Deferred Revenue modules in place earlier, but with a focus on cash management and time resources, we’ve waited on multiple implementations until it was right for the business…not for what was convenient or bragging rights of extra system horsepower that ultimately sat idle in the garage.

The challenge we’ll continue to embrace moving forward is how lean we can continue to run while providing top tier business intelligence to the rest of the team and responding to the needs of our outside vendors and partners. While we might be currently smaller in revenues than most of the other companies I’ve worked with, our trajectory is on plan and we have a great operational foundation in place to support it. The satisfaction I get from testing our systems and processes isn’t much different than the Sales Director who gets that purchase order…it feels like a win. It’s great to be working with a team that’s always focused on the test and ensuring that daily efforts put us in the strongest position possible.

Thanks for reading…

Jeffrey Ishmael

CFO’s & Cyber Risk: Protecting Your Performance…& Shareholders

May 2nd, 2014 Comments off

As a CFO, I can’t help but be a bit shocked at the recent article on CFO.com “CFO’s Disregarding Cyber Risks”.  In my position, and more in relation to my past positions, my involvement with IT-related activities typically centered on the ongoing assessments of our ERP platforms, annual budgets, necessary capex, and the standard operational issues. I can honestly say that cyber risks were really not part of our ongoing concerns, nor was the topic ever tabled by the rest of the senior leadership team or the Board. We also weren’t planning in an environment where billion dollar breaches were being reported in the press.

Fast forward a few years and it’s hard not to take note, and initiate an elevated level of planning, in the face of the Target breach that occurred just prior to the Holiday shopping season. I don’t care what industry you work in, any CFO should take note of a company which, in a single Quarter, revises their earnings estimates down by 25%, or approximately $250 million. How about a revision in revenue estimates that takes the topline down by almost $1 billion….in a single Quarter! Even more importantly, at the time of the revisions, the company was unable to assess the potential impact of the breach beyond the current Quarter. That event by itself should have every CFO looking over their shoulder and considering the proverbial “what if”. Evidently not…

In the recent article on CFO.com, which drew 600 responses, CFO’s ranked data privacy only 12th on their list of corporate risks. In comparison, data privacy ranked 26th on their list in 2013. While the level of importance is rising, it’s still not being given the proper level of attention. At the top of their list was legal and regulatory shifts. In hindsight, I would love to have someone provide me an example where legal or regulatory changes resulted in an immediate and material revision to earnings or revenues. These are typically changes that are discussed over extended periods and phased in, thus allowing the company and shareholders to digest the resulting changes in how the company reports its results. This is in stark contrast to waking up and realizing you’ve just compromised the privacy for 70 million of your customers in the most critical shopping time of the year.

What was also concerning about the article is that 57% of the respondents weren’t analyzing whether they had enough cyber insurance coverage or weren’t undertaking additional key activities to sufficiently mitigate the risk of cyber risk. This was not only happening at the senior leadership level, but at the Board level as well. While the public and general investing community is aware of the breaches that are reported in the press, I know I have taken an entirely different approach to my personal cyber security as a result of the work I see our team doing across a wide spectrum of industries and with companies that are very recognizable to us all.

As a CFO, if you want to ensure that all of your costs saving initiatives and EBIT performance aren’t compromised, the investment in a security solution will pale in comparison if you do encounter a significant breach…

Thanks for reading…

Jeffrey Ishmael

Proactive, Reactive, & The Need To Balance Resources…

March 13th, 2014 Comments off

As we’ve recently come off a successful Series-B fundraising effort that included our original partners Khosla Ventures and Fairhaven Capital, as well as our newest partner Blackstone, it really affirmed the delicate walk we’ve managed over the last 18-months. With the initial $15 million in funding we received we knew what our mission was and the support structure we would need to have in place to make it happen. This consideration was not just to the staffing we would need to bring on, but the systems we would have in place to support our decision making.

I still remember the amusement I had when, fresh off an SAP implementation, I was given my laptop with QuickBooks installed. While that was fine for the first few months, that certainly wasn’t going to be our longer term solution. Nor was I going to pony up the dollars for an Oracle or other similar platform. With a commitment to be surgical about our spend, we mapped out what system would be needed to support our sales efforts, service deployment, as well as our financial reporting….all of which needed to be integrated. We were trying to be as proactive as possible, but new we’d have to pivot at points along the way.  We successfully brought Salesforce.com online, and with the hire of a VP of Sales, who developed the necessary criteria to report on our bookings activities. We then integrated our services management platform, which then final rolled into our financial reporting system.

However, as the business continued to mature, we found ourselves having to react to changes that forced us to pivot. We reached a point that it was necessary to extract ourselves from an early PEO commitment and bring all of our payroll and benefits administration in house.  Although we did not originally commit to the HR module, the time had come to add this on and react to our expanding business. This obviously meant more time and more money…that precious commodity we were so diligently managing. We continued to walk the path of being proactive on the critical elements, but reactive on those that we could push until the moment we actually needed to spend and weren’t creating any risk to the business.

Our earlier decisions on whether to spend proactively or reactively were put to the test during our due diligence efforts. Our earlier efforts to invest in systems have allowed us to continue operating in a very lean manner operationally. With myself and a one analyst, we were able to manage through the onslaught of document requests, additional modeling, and review of systems to achieve the final sign offs that led to our Series-B funding. Although there were some smaller operational elements that we could have fine-tuned in advance, it was a derivative of our decision to operate in a lean manner. Those elements are obviously being addressed moving forward, but do not affect our ability to service our employees, customers, or business partners.

Even now with a fresh round of funding, we will continue our prudence with spend and walk the delicate line of when we should be proactive or reactive. While it’s always preferable to head down the path of proactive decisions, it’s not always best for the company if the deployment of those resources aren’t necessarily mission critical and have an extended window for return. The one certainty…this period of early stage growth will continue to be a target rich environment!

Thanks for reading…

Jeffrey Ishmael

Start-Up Fun. A Fiscal Year Review…

July 25th, 2013 Comments off

I think I have been living the adage of “time flies when you’re having fun…”.  I realized yesterday that it had been almost a full two months since my last blog entry and I was a bit mortified. Especially when I try and keep a strong discipline in all aspects of my life. However, when I look back on what has been happening the last 60-days, it’s easy to see how that could have happened. With the final wrap-up of an ERP implementation and the closing of our first fiscal year, it’s been a crazy few months. But it’s not just the last few months, it’s the satisfaction of looking back over the last year and seeing what we have been able to accomplish as a team. While I’m obviously not going to share financial results or product development achievements, the growth and operational achievements are something for the team to be proud of.

When I first started with Cylance, we were all of 7 employees, I was given a laptop with Quickbooks installed on it, and the company had signed on with a PEO to administer our payroll and benefits. The company’s founder, Stuart McClure, had just started to implement his vision and we were working out of a living room. At that point, you couldn’t have asked for a cleaner slate to move the company forward. Fast forward to now and you realize how much of a transformation this company has gone through.

While I continued to use Quickbooks for a short amount of time, we put tremendous effort into bringing a sales management platform online to manage the opportunities we were already seeing coming into the company. Once we had the confidence we had effectively installed the first phase of our automation, we moved on to implement an additional platform aimed at the management of our professional services business. How do you make effective business decisions if you don’t have the ability to measure your business? A rhetorical question I know, but those needs can easily be lost in a hectic start-up environment. Once we were about halfway through that effort, we already knew that we were going to have to upgrade the Finance side of the house so we could have seamless integration of all three platforms. Hence, the process started to interview ERP candidates. I started having bad flashbacks to the SAP implementation I had carved myself out of a year prior. However, we aligned ourselves with a great partner and the calendar was set to bring the final piece online. As with everything else, we committed to the calendar and executed to the exact day and brought all elements of the business online with platforms that will support us for years to come.

Time for a break…right? Not even close. The next big step, with a VERY underestimated effort of what it would take, was to extract ourselves from our PEO parent on payroll and benefits and bring that entire effort in house. This might have been more painful than the SAP implementation, but a worthwhile endeavor. Again, a full interviewing of partner candidates. In the end, we were able to achieve savings, enhance our benefits offering to employees, and be the master of our destiny with regards to program management. We successfully brought our benefits offering online and on time, as well as bringing all payroll processing internal.

What a year it’s been. But wait…there’s more. Toss in the scouting for a new corporate office, 3 different office moves before we settled permanently, an increase in our employee count from 7 to 60, the development of a remarkable team, customer base, and marketing results that would make most established companies envious. Ok, now for a break….right?

We’re not just knocking on the door of our 2014 fiscal year, but we’re kicking it in. It’s still a target rich environment and the task list is longer than Santa’s naughty & nice list in December. At the end of the day, you need to look back on the day, the week, and ultimately, the last year and feel satisfaction with what you’ve accomplished. Start-ups are not for the faint of heart and you need to stay motivated and driven. It’s easy to stay that way when you have a mission you’re committed to and a team that is equally committed.

Thanks for reading…

Jeffrey Ishmael

Cylance, Inc. Launches & Comes Out of Stealth Mode…!

February 13th, 2013 Comments off

Cylance, Inc. today formally announced $15 million in funding from Khosla Ventures and Fairhaven Capital, along with the Board of Directors and Advisors that have been put in place to help guide the company for the years ahead. While this day is merely the culmination of months of hard work by a team I have come to admire over the last 7-months, it still feels fantastic to take a day and celebrate the accomplishments of the team and what we have to look forward to. The full details of the press release can be found on our website at www.cylance.com .

A bigger affirmation for the mission and future of this company are the backers and advisors that have come on board. Khosla Ventures was founded by Vinod Khosla in 2004 where he was formerly a General Partner at Kleiner Perkins, as well as a co-founder of Sun Microsystems. Fairhaven Capital is a venture capital firm focused on themes in the enterprise, physical technologies, media infrastructure, and security markets. Both are neither strangers to technology, nor are they a stranger to the talent and abilities of Stuart McClure, the founder of Cylance.

In addition to the funding, Stuart has been able to assemble an incredibly high caliber Board of Directors and Advisors with additions that include Patrick Heim, former Kaiser Permanente CSO and now Chief Trust Officer at Salesforce.com, Admiral William J. Fallon, U.S. Navy (Retired) former Commander, U.S. Central and U.S. Pacific Commands, and Alex Doll, former co-founder and COO of PGP who sold to Symantec in 2010, who will guide the Company to achieve its goals. With this Board pedigree, Cylance has a deep and diverse team to help guide the Company. An equally talented Board of Advisors brings together a diverse group of experts to solve the complex security problems that the industry currently faces. Advisors include: Paul Forney (Invensys), David Willson (Army/NSA), Shane Shook (KPMG/PwC), Robert Bigman (CIA), Stewart Baker (Steptoe/NSA), Alex Nazaruk (GetCo), Michael Rauchman (GetCo), Eric Culp (formerly of ESRI), and Joseph Gabbert (formerly of McAfee and EMC).

The team here at Cylance has an incredible opportunity, and a fantastic level of support to carry out the mission at hand. As I’ve written in previous posts, it’s all about delivering on what you promise and driving high levels of performance. With the team and backing that has been assembled, this is merely the first step. There’s more to come, but it feels great to formally step out from behind the curtain and share more detail about what has been assembled for the future.

Thanks for reading…

Jeffrey Ishmael